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In open spaces within the cities, rickshaw pullers find places to park their rickshaws and store personal belongings and cooking supplies. This photograph was taken in the early morning, before the rickshaw wallahs concealed their belongings and left for work. All photos and drawings courtesy of the author.

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(left) Chandigarh’s singular architectural style has created omnipresent architectural details. The ledge located above the columns at left has become a handy place for immigrant workers to hide their bedding. During the day it is out of view, and when the market closes, it is only an arm’s reach away. (right) Chandigarh’s wealth of trees has afforded the city many things, including storage for the belongings of homeless residents.

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(left) Signs were partially painted on-site in Sector 17. The nine members of the New Kranti Rickshaw Workers Union decided what details to display on one side. The name of the union and the founding year were displayed on the opposite side. (right) Portrait of Shravan Kumar, a cycle-rickshaw puller since 1995.

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Lateral elevation of a cycle-rickshaw cart showing detachable sign.

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Photograph of Shravan Kumar’s detachable sign.

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Translation of Shravan Kumar’s detachable sign.



John Buonocore is a designer, carpenter, and prospective architect. As an undergraduate architecture student at Columbia College, Buonocore became interested in the ways architecture can be used as a tool for public advocacy. After graduation, he was awarded the Percival and Naomi Goodman Fellowship to research homeless populations in Chandigarh, India, and exhibited “Pulling People: Chandigarh’s Working Homeless” at The Tunnel Gallery, Barnard College.

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